Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Aloha to New England - Salem Witches


Salem is synonymous with witches.  From Wikipedia (link)

Featured notably in Arthur Miller's The Crucible, much of the city's cultural identity is reflective of its role as the location of the Salem witch trials of 1692: Police cars are adorned with witch logos, a local public school is known as the Witchcraft Heights Elementary School, the Salem High School athletic teams are named the Witches; and Gallows Hill, a site of numerous public hangings, is currently used as a playing field for various sports. Tourists know Salem as a mix of important historical sites, New Ageand Wiccan boutiques, kitschy Halloween, witch-themed attractions and a vibrant downtown that has more than 60 restaurants, cafes and coffee shops.


We walked by the Witch House.  From its website (link),

In 1675, Jonathan Corwin, heir to one of the largest Puritan fortunes in New England , purchased this large and stately house. Seventeen years later,Corwin and his family would take part in the most famous Witch Hunt in American History.


Around the corner, we found an inventive way to address parking violations.



Aren't all books wicked good?



This taro reader dressed in costume to promote her business.



Look who we found in the town square!  TV Land Network commissioned the bronze statue of Elizabeth Montgomery from BEWITCHED.


Do you have a favorite fictional witch from books, movies, or TV?  One randomly selected commenter from this week's blogs wins a book choice from my convention stash.  Comments are open through Saturday, October 4, 10 pm in Baltimore.  I'll post the winner on Sunday, October 5.

Mahalo,

Kim in Baltimore
Aloha Spirit in Charm City



Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Aloha to New England - Salem Maritime History


Hubby and I traveled north of Boston to Salem.  Our first stop was the Salem Maritime National Historic Site.  From its website (link),

When the United States was young, ships from Salem, Massachusetts helped to build the new nation's economy by carrying cargo back and forth from the West to Asia. The historic buildings, wharves, and reconstructed tall ship at this nine-acre National Park tell the stories of the sailors, Revolutionary War privateers, and merchants who brought the riches of the world to America.



The Salem East Indiaman Friendship was launched in 1797.  She made 15 voyages during her career to Batavia, India, China, South America, the Caribbean, England, Germany, the Mediterranean, and Russia.


Built for the Salem mercantile firm Waite and Peirce in the South River shipyard of Enos Briggs, she ended her activities as an American merchant vessel when she was captured as a prize of war by the British Sloop of War HMSRosamond in September 1812.


We walked to the town center ....


... for ice cream!


What's your flavor of ice cream?  One randomly selected commenter from this week's comments wins a book choice from my convention stash.  Comments are open through Saturday, October 4, 10 pm.  I'll post the winner on Sunday, October 5, on SOS Aloha.

Mahalo,

Kim in Baltimore
Aloha Spirit in Charm City




Monday, September 29, 2014

Aloha to New England - North Bridge


The British Regulars departed Boston on April 18, 1775 to destroy the Colonists' munitions rumored to be stored in Concord.  After encountering Minute Men on Lexington Green, they arrived in Concord the next morning to search the town.   Their commander, Lt. Col Smith, sent columns to guard the North and South bridges into the town.   When the Minute Men saw the town burning, they confronted the British Regulars on the North Bridge - the Revolutionary War was born. 


In 1875, Daniel Chester French created the Minute Man Statue of a farmer-turned-soldier to honor those who fought for our country's independence. The Minute Man Statue was cast using cannons from the Civil War.  The scultpure sits on the west side of the Concord River.


One of Concord's sons, Nathaniel Hawthorne, once observed that the name Concord represents peace.


Today, the bridge is peaceful and welcomes tourists.


The stone obelisk sits on the east side of the Concord River.


The Old Manse sits along the Concord River and witnessed the battle.  From its website (link),

A handsome Georgian clapboard building, The Old Manse sits near the banks of the Concord River among rolling fields edged by centuries-old stone walls and graced by an orchard. From upstairs, you can look out over the North Bridge, where the famous battle of April 19, 1775, took place. Ralph Waldo Emerson and Nathaniel Hawthorne both called the Manse home for a time – and each found inspiration here. Emerson would draft his famous essay “Nature” from an upstairs room, and Hawthorne would write a tribute to the homestead calledMosses from an Old Manse.


The Old Manse overlooks the graves of British soldiers who retreated from the North Bridge.

Have you read Emerson or Hawthorne?  One randomly selected commenter from this week's blogs wins a book choice from my convention stash.  Comments are open through Saturday, October 4, 10 pm in Baltimore.  I'll post the winner on Sunday, October 5 at SOS Aloha.

Mahalo,

Kim in Baltimore
Aloha Spirit in Charm City


Sunday, September 28, 2014

Aloha to New England - Potpourri from Chelmsford


During our trip to New England, we arrived early in the town of Chelmsford to dine with college friends.  From Wikipedia (link),

Named after Chelmsford, England, the town was incorporated in May 1655 by an act of the Massachusetts General Court. When Chelmsford was incorporated, its local economy was fueled by lumber mills, limestone quarries and kilns. The Chelmsford militia played a role in the American Revolution at the Battle of Lexington and the Battle of Bunker Hill. The farming community of East Chelmsford was incorporated as Lowell in the 1820s; over the next decades it would go on to become one of the first large-scale factory towns in the United States because of its early role in the country's Industrial Revolution.


The Adams name is frequently found in New England!


We spotted an granite marker ...


... for an Eagle Scout project!


The library laminated a coffee table with business cards from other libraries ... love it!

Tell me about your local library!  One randomly selected commenter from this week's blogs wins a book choice from my convention stash.  Comments are open through Saturday.   I'll post the winner on Sunday at SOS Aloha.

Mahalo,

Kim in Baltimore
Aloha Spirit in Charm City

Our favorite business card!

Saturday, September 27, 2014

Aloha to New England - Harvard University (Part 2)


 

Continuing our self guided walking tour of Harvard univesrity, we finally found the Ivy!


Many historic buildings dot the skyline ...


... while rowers enjoy the solitude of the Charles River.


The Harvard Bridge gives a glimpse of downtown Boston.


Imagine living in this dorm!


So many buidlings in Boston are named after the Adams Family.


This gate to the campus inspires students.


I overheard a student guide point to this doorway as the home of one of Harvard's secret societies.


We enjoyed our own walking tour ... but we could appreciate the costumed guides!


What are your thoughts on Harvard University?  One randomly selected commenter from this week's blogs wins a book choice from my convention stash.   Comments are open through Saturday, October 4, 10 pm in Baltimore.  I'll post the winner on Sunday, October 5, at SOS Aloha.

Mahalo,

Kim in Baltimore
Aloha Spirit in Charm City

Politics aside, I laughed at this bumper sticker.


Friday, September 26, 2014

Aloha to New England - Harvard University (part 1)

 

During our recent trip to New England, hubby and I enjoyed a self guided walking tour of Harvard University.  From its website (link),

Harvard is the oldest institution of higher education in the United States, established in 1636 by vote of the Great and General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. It was named after the College’s first benefactor, the young minister John Harvard of Charlestown, who upon his death in 1638 left his library and half his estate to the institution. A statue of John Harvard stands today in front of University Hall in Harvard Yard, and is perhaps the University’s best known landmark.


The open campus enabled us to walk around the historic buildings while students scurried to classes.   


We found several tribute in the Memorial Chapel, including the plaque to the women from Radcliffe College who gave the ultimate sacrifice in WWI.


This wall represents the men from Harvard who died in WWII ...


... including a German soldier who graduated form the Divinity School.


Completed in 1878, the Memorial Hall remembers Harvard Graduates who served in the Civil War ... 


... including another graduate from the Divinity School.


The historic buildings still serve students as classrooms.


I was not familiar with General Ward from the Revolutionary Ward.   President John Adams described him as "...universally esteemed, beloved and confided in by his army and his country."  Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. was a physician, poet, professor, lecturer, and author.  His son, Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., served as the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.


Do you have a historic school near you?  One randomly selected commenter from this week's blogs wins a book choice from my convention stash.  Comments are open through Saturday, October 4, 10 pm in Baltimore.  I'll post the winner on Sunday, October 5.

Mahalo,

Kim in Baltimore
Aloha Spirit in Charm City

Chocolate Therapy in Harvard Square